johncoxon: (Default)
I have been a little bit lax with updating this, so here we go. I really haven't done enough reading this year... I blame exams, roleplaying games and Half-Life 2.

The books )
johncoxon: (Default)
I have been a little bit lax with updating this, so here we go. I really haven't done enough reading this year... I blame exams, roleplaying games and Half-Life 2.

The books )
johncoxon: (Default)
I have been a little bit lax with updating this, so here we go. I really haven't done enough reading this year... I blame exams, roleplaying games and Half-Life 2.

The books )
johncoxon: (Default)
#7 Andy Diggle & Jock, The Losers: Ante Up, 2003/04
#8 Andy Diggle & Jock, The Losers: Double Down, 2004

I thought I'd give these a go because of the film that's recently been in theatres that was based on the comics. Jock's art is really bold, and he uses only a few colours in each page to really evoke a bleakness in the story that was also captured quite well in the film. Andy Diggle's story is also really good and compelling, making me want to read on. However, I'm recognising scenes in the comic that were in the film, and the film's take on things is just slightly slicker. The characters are brought to life more effectively, the plans are subtly cleverer, and there is a veneer of humour that isn't really present in the comics. The comics are awesome, but the film's a little bit better. I will definitely continue with the series in print, however! If you didn't see the film, I recommend you catch it at the cinema if you still can; if not, I recommend acquiring and watching it at some point.
johncoxon: (Default)
#7 Andy Diggle & Jock, The Losers: Ante Up, 2003/04
#8 Andy Diggle & Jock, The Losers: Double Down, 2004

I thought I'd give these a go because of the film that's recently been in theatres that was based on the comics. Jock's art is really bold, and he uses only a few colours in each page to really evoke a bleakness in the story that was also captured quite well in the film. Andy Diggle's story is also really good and compelling, making me want to read on. However, I'm recognising scenes in the comic that were in the film, and the film's take on things is just slightly slicker. The characters are brought to life more effectively, the plans are subtly cleverer, and there is a veneer of humour that isn't really present in the comics. The comics are awesome, but the film's a little bit better. I will definitely continue with the series in print, however! If you didn't see the film, I recommend you catch it at the cinema if you still can; if not, I recommend acquiring and watching it at some point.
johncoxon: (Default)
#7 Andy Diggle & Jock, The Losers: Ante Up, 2003/04
#8 Andy Diggle & Jock, The Losers: Double Down, 2004

I thought I'd give these a go because of the film that's recently been in theatres that was based on the comics. Jock's art is really bold, and he uses only a few colours in each page to really evoke a bleakness in the story that was also captured quite well in the film. Andy Diggle's story is also really good and compelling, making me want to read on. However, I'm recognising scenes in the comic that were in the film, and the film's take on things is just slightly slicker. The characters are brought to life more effectively, the plans are subtly cleverer, and there is a veneer of humour that isn't really present in the comics. The comics are awesome, but the film's a little bit better. I will definitely continue with the series in print, however! If you didn't see the film, I recommend you catch it at the cinema if you still can; if not, I recommend acquiring and watching it at some point.
johncoxon: (Default)

Sat in the sun reading today because it was nice out. I'm about to head to a film night at a couple of coursemates' house, so I may commit Twitter later (or even more LiveJournal if you're really lucky!).

#5 The Boys #31-38 (collected in The Self-Preservation Society), 2009/10

These are the last comics I'm buying in this series as comics -- future reads will be trade paperbacks, since the series is being completely collected. The series is continuing and is still an enjoyable read, but unlike Preacher, there is very little variation from arc to arc. Ennis has found a niche and is sticking with it, I guess. Although judging from the cover art for the next comic, that may all be about to change!

#6 Jhonen Vasquez, JTHM: Director's Cut, 1997

This was completely strange and bizarre but made me giggle inanely quite a lot so I'm willing to forgive it for that! The book is a compendium of stories about Johnny the Homicidal Maniac (you can call him "nny"), who is an interesting character to say the least! There was virtually no plot for the first half of the book, but the second half starts to establish a continous storyline which is fun to follow. Overall I thought the structure worked quite well, and the incredibly bleak and surreal humour was brilliant. I am thankful Andrew lent it to me!

Posted via LiveJournal.app.

johncoxon: (Default)

Sat in the sun reading today because it was nice out. I'm about to head to a film night at a couple of coursemates' house, so I may commit Twitter later (or even more LiveJournal if you're really lucky!).

#5 The Boys #31-38 (collected in The Self-Preservation Society), 2009/10

These are the last comics I'm buying in this series as comics -- future reads will be trade paperbacks, since the series is being completely collected. The series is continuing and is still an enjoyable read, but unlike Preacher, there is very little variation from arc to arc. Ennis has found a niche and is sticking with it, I guess. Although judging from the cover art for the next comic, that may all be about to change!

#6 Jhonen Vasquez, JTHM: Director's Cut, 1997

This was completely strange and bizarre but made me giggle inanely quite a lot so I'm willing to forgive it for that! The book is a compendium of stories about Johnny the Homicidal Maniac (you can call him "nny"), who is an interesting character to say the least! There was virtually no plot for the first half of the book, but the second half starts to establish a continous storyline which is fun to follow. Overall I thought the structure worked quite well, and the incredibly bleak and surreal humour was brilliant. I am thankful Andrew lent it to me!

Posted via LiveJournal.app.

johncoxon: (Default)

Sat in the sun reading today because it was nice out. I'm about to head to a film night at a couple of coursemates' house, so I may commit Twitter later (or even more LiveJournal if you're really lucky!).

#5 The Boys #31-38 (collected in The Self-Preservation Society), 2009/10

These are the last comics I'm buying in this series as comics -- future reads will be trade paperbacks, since the series is being completely collected. The series is continuing and is still an enjoyable read, but unlike Preacher, there is very little variation from arc to arc. Ennis has found a niche and is sticking with it, I guess. Although judging from the cover art for the next comic, that may all be about to change!

#6 Jhonen Vasquez, JTHM: Director's Cut, 1997

This was completely strange and bizarre but made me giggle inanely quite a lot so I'm willing to forgive it for that! The book is a compendium of stories about Johnny the Homicidal Maniac (you can call him "nny"), who is an interesting character to say the least! There was virtually no plot for the first half of the book, but the second half starts to establish a continous storyline which is fun to follow. Overall I thought the structure worked quite well, and the incredibly bleak and surreal humour was brilliant. I am thankful Andrew lent it to me!

Posted via LiveJournal.app.

johncoxon: (Default)
#4 Fabian Nicieza, Mark Brooks and Patrick Zircher; Cable and Deadpool Vol. 1: If Looks Could Kill, 2004

This was my first exposure to either of the title characters and I must say I am loving Deadpool's attitude to life and his complete reluctance to take anything seriously. The plot behind the two characters was OK – it felt a little disjointed in parts, but it was still good, and I was too busy loving Deadpool to mind. I think I probably need to pick some more of these up at some point, along with more in The Sandman.
johncoxon: (Default)
#3 Neil Gaiman, Jill Thompson and Vince Locke; The Sandman Vol. 7: Brief Lives; 1992-93

I have not read a volume of The Sandman for over two years, and the time elapsed is probably much closer to being four years. Nothing I can say can accurately convey how much I enjoyed returning to the epic that I still think stands head-and-shoulders above the rest of his bibliography. I shall be very tempted to purchase Vol. 8 soon, I think!
johncoxon: (Default)
#42 Arthur C. Clarke, 2061: Odyssey Three, 1987

Arthur C. Clarke's ideas are as awesome as ever in this, the third in the series of novels. Much like the other books, the last few chapters were slightly trippy, but the attention to detail was absolutely superb! Clarke is one of the SF authors that continually provides ample reminder of why I chose to pursue a career in physics, and I value him enormously for that.

#43 Mike Carey et al, Lucifer: Devil in the Gateway, 1999/2000
#44 Mike Carey et al, Lucifer: Children and Monsters, 2000/01

I haven't actually read far enough in Neil Gaiman's The Sandman to appreciate the origins of the character fully but I loved Mike Carey's adaptation of Gaiman's Neverwhere and, as old-school readers of my fanzine will know, Lucifer as a character has always held a certain fascination for me. Thus, the series that continues Lucifer's adventures was a very tempting purchase and has proven to be a bloody brilliant read. Both paperbacks are highly recommended material!

#45 Alan Moore and Brian Bolland, Batman: The Killing Joke, 1988

This was shorter than I expected it to be, clocking in at 46 pages (I believe), but every page was solid gold so that was OK. The contributions from Tim Sale and the artist, Brian Bolland, were interesting to read and Bolland's shorter Batman script afterwards was weird and disturbing in an awesome way. I've read some awesome comics today!

#46 Garth Ennis et al, Judge Dredd: Emerald Isle, 1991/92

Looking at the cover of this TPB doesn't really make me think that this is intended to be an entirely serious story, and a glance at Wikipedia confirms that suspicion. It's a good read, though, even though I suspect I'd have been better off reading something else for my first experience of Dredd.
johncoxon: (Default)
In an attempt to list the comics I read (so, Hellblazer and The Boys, then) as part of this meme, what I've decided to do is keep an eye on Wikipedia, find out which issues fit into which TPB and sort of list them based on that (so, for instance, Roots of Coincidence is a new TPB collecting #243-#244 and #247-#249, so after reading #249 I am counting #243-#249 as a book).

#22 Hellblazer #243-#249 (partly collected in Roots of Coincidence), 2009

I've just finished reading the second story arc of this slice of Hellblazer and whilst I quite liked it I thought it all seemed a bit rushed. Having said that, I did come to #247 having not read any Hellblazer for a while so perhaps it worked better if read as a whole. There were a couple of bits that really made me think, "awww, cool!" so I definitely came out grinning.

#23 Hellblazer #250-#255 (partly collected in Scab), 2009

The first issue in this slice is an anthology of short stories set in John's world, and I really enjoyed them all (except for the one which was a poem, which I found myself skipping over). The rest is Peter Milligan's first stint as writer, with Camuncoli/Landini for the first story-arc and Sudzuka/Ramos for the latter (both storylines have very clean art). The first issue is brilliant – the graffiti around the door particularly inspired – and the storyline continues with some really creepy shit. The second storyline is a two-parter which starts well and gets weird quickly before an ending that really reminds you of what a bastard Constantine can be.

#24 Chas: The Knowledge #1-#5 (collected in Hellblazer: Chas), 2009

This is a spinoff from Hellblazer which doesn't feature as much of John as usual, but does feature a whole lot of Chas, which I'm always up for. It was a good arc, and nice to see Chas get one up on John rather than the other way around!

#25 The Boys #23-30 (colleted in We Gotta Go Now), 2009

I'm close to stopping getting this as comics since it's fully collected in TPBs which I'm fairly sure I prefer. Anyway, this arc of the series (which has now been running for close to three years) was good. Not much else to say about it, and the series isn't impressing me nearly as much as Preacher did, but we shall see where the next arc goes.
johncoxon: (Default)
#13 Frank Miller, Klaus Janson and Lynn Varley, Batman: The Dark Knight Returns, 1986

Wow.

...that is all.
johncoxon: (Default)
#8 Alan Moore and Kevin O'Neill, The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen: Volume One, 1999/2000

Good book. I loved the references to Sherlock Holmes, Mycroft Holmes and Prof. Moriarty, although I'll be honest, I don't feel that the characterisation of any of the three of them was really very good (they certainly didn't feel the same as they did in Arthur Conan Doyle's writing). I've been meaning to read this collection for a while so I'm glad I finally got around to doing it.
johncoxon: (Default)
Right then. Firstly, I'll be writing and editing the newsletter at LX... I also plan to be spending some time on [livejournal.com profile] zz9's table in the Dealers' Room and I want to gopher for an hour or two (probably on the Friday or Monday) if I get bored, but here are the seven panels you'll be able to see me on during the convention:

Saturday

14:00: Fanzines 101
"Find out more about the mysteries of fanzines. Some current editors tell you how easy it is to publish within the fannish community." [Guess this means I really do have to write the seventh issue of Procrastinations in time for LX, then...]

17:00: SF, technology and games
"Almost every SF trend, from artificial intelligence to virtual reality, was embraced by the gaming industry first (or at least that's what some gamers like to think). But what has the gaming world really been like over these last few decades? How did it compare to what SF promised us it would be? Which are the noteworthy games in this regard, past and future? And where is the industry really heading to?"

21:00: Adapting comics for the big screen
"What makes a good adaptation of a comic book - faithfulness to the text, or willingness to change it for the screen? Can you film the unfilmable? What makes The Dark Knight so good, and The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen so bad?" [I'd have several interesting things to say on this subject but given I'm moderating and there are some very loud people on the panel already, I reckon I'm going to spend most of my time desperately trying to maintain a pretence of control on a sinking ship... Ought to be a whole lot of fun!]

Sunday

11:00: Twitter: Ego boosting, or information busting?
"Twitter has recently hit the news and is the latest internet fashion. Is it full of trivia, rubbish and egotistical nonsense, or is it a useful tool for collecting information and communicating? This panel takes a look at how Twitter is developing and it's potential impact on the Internet."

20:00: Couldn't I just waste him with my crossbow?
"What if books were more like games, with no need to take into account pesky things such as plot lines and narrative coherence? What alignment would Gandalf be? How many hit points does one give Sauron? Couldn't Bilbo just jump on Gollum's head? A humoristic look at how famous (and not so famous) works of fiction would have played out."

Monday

11:00: Conventions and breaking them, or lifting up your game!
"Does a role-playing group have to be fun with dice and pizzas, or running around the woods with a plastic sword? Can your game feel more like a literary masterpiece? A comic? A screenplay? Our panel discuss techniques and experiences from their own gaming groups."

12:30 Battlestar Galactica
"The much-praised show has come to an end. Did it live up to the promise of the early seasons, or lose its way in the end? How will it be remembered?" [Note to self: watch last three episodes of BSG before Easter.]
johncoxon: (Default)
#7 Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons, Watchmen, 1986/7

This is obviously an extremely iconic and important book and is widely regarded as one of the best comic series ever. I must confess that although I really enjoyed it, the amiguity at the end meant that I think I slightly preferred V For Vendetta, but it's still an awesome book. I must say that I felt there were slightly too many plot threads - I'm sure when I reread it after the movie on Friday I will see things I missed on the first readthrough, but I have this nagging feeling that certain aspects rather passed over my head. I will have to pay more attention the second time around!
johncoxon: (Default)
The last time I updated this thing properly was Christmas. That's possibly a bit of a long time, since then it's just been 15 or so entries on not a lot, so I'm going to give you guys an update here.

I went to several comedy shows during the Leicester Comedy Festival - Jim Smallman, Tim Minchin, Ed Aczel, Ed Byrne. Minchin did his new show, which I believe is touring Australia at the moment before coming back to the UK later this year - see it if you can, it's got some really good songs in it (as anyone who saw my Twitter during the concert will already know!). Ed Byrne's set was also really, really good - it's coming back to Leicester later this year, so I assume it's still touring elsewhere in the UK. I recommend seeing it if you can, I really enjoyed it. Ed Aczel was weird (as I was expecting), and two or three people walked out of his show, but I was laughing so that was fine. And Jim Smallman is a comedian I've seen a few times, but his set was as funny as always.

Tonight was the Geek Quiz. I've just received a text telling me that my team didn't actually win (it went to tiebreak, but apparently an answer has been discovered to be inaccurate since the end of the evening so my team lost by two points), but it was a good evening. And we won the competition to get most kicker questions (really hard questions at the end of every round designed to sort the men from the boys).

What else has happened? Not a whole lot. Had a friend from home visit recently, and shortly afterwards I also went home - saw all my brothers which was awesome, and celebrated my grandparents' wedding anniversary. I've been doing uni as usual, and it's been going averagely. I'm now social secretary of the Game Society, and I was elected president on Monday, so I'll be president next year. We're having a twenty-four hour board gaming social in a fortnight's time which ought to be epic.

On the subject of Gamesoc, I've been playing more Warhammer 40,000 - I'm getting better, slowly but surely. I beat my friend Ash the other day, and I've won one lost two in the doubles tournament that's running (I confidently anticipate placing in the middle somewhere). We also played a 6000pts/side game of Imperial Guard vs Necrons, which was good fun. We Necrons won, but by the skin of our teeth!

I'm also now on the committee for LL3, which is absolutely definitely probably happening in summer 2010. Unfortunately, someone decided that during exams was the best time to hold a convention, so I can't go to Plokta, which is annoying. I also couldn't have gone to Redemption, even if I'd remembered it was happening, due to family commitments. I should be at Constitution this summer though, so I'll see some of you there. I'm also (obviously) still going to be at LX and Odyssey 2010.

Can't think of much else happening in my life. Didn't win the lottery tonight, that was a shame! I am now going to shower, buy peanut butter from the twenty-four hour Spar down the road, and hit the hay, as I'm up at something ridiculous like 07:00 tomorrow morning for Picocon. I plan to read Watchmen for the first time on the train, in anticipation of the film on Friday. See some of you there!

xkcd

Oct. 2nd, 2008 01:11 am
johncoxon: (Default)
Well, he doesn't mention Shakespeare...

Critics

Aug. 8th, 2008 07:53 pm
johncoxon: (Default)
Over on the blog for the popular game-based webcomic PvP, Scott Kurtz has explained why he feels one should never be open to the possibility that the critic is right. Now, Kurtz is someone who draws a good comic, and I love PvP to bits, but seriously? Never even allowing yourself to concede that sometimes, a critic may have a point? That just reeks of arrogance to me. The post hasn't got a comment feature (presumably because anyone who comments should either say "IAWTC" or should not comment, and reading "IAWTC" fifty times would get boring) so I decided I'd rant here instead. It's not the first time I've disagreed with Kurtz's stance on something, but...

Most Popular Tags

Syndicate

RSS Atom

July 2014

S M T W T F S
  12345
6789101112
13141516171819
2021 2223242526
2728293031  

Style Credit

Powered by Dreamwidth Studios