GIP

Oct. 14th, 2012 02:30 am
johncoxon: ([HHGG] Wikipedia)
GUYS THIS USERPIC IS INSANELY AWESOME

GIP

Oct. 14th, 2012 02:30 am
johncoxon: ([HHGG] Wikipedia)
GUYS THIS USERPIC IS INSANELY AWESOME
johncoxon: (Default)
This is a fantastically interesting blogpost about Starship Titanic that begins with an explanation of how to get the game running on Windows/Mac/Linux for free and ends up with Yoz Grahame, one of the chaps who worked on the game, posting some of his experiences and anecdotes from the game in the comments. One of the things he posts is a ninety minute conversation between Steve Meretzky, who co-wrote Douglas' first Infocom game, and Michael Bywater, who worked on various projects with/instead of Douglas.

Worth a look if you're a fan of the man, and my fondest appreciation to BoingBoing for putting it in my RSS feed this morning!

On a vaguely similar note, people may have noticed that my Delicious bookmark posts have not been happening recently. I'm experimenting with Pinboard as a replacement for my social bookmarking requirements, but they don't yet have a post-to-blog option. I believe I can get them to sync with my Delicious account, though, so I may try to get something going again in the near future.

Happy Christmas, everybody!
johncoxon: (Default)
This is a fantastically interesting blogpost about Starship Titanic that begins with an explanation of how to get the game running on Windows/Mac/Linux for free and ends up with Yoz Grahame, one of the chaps who worked on the game, posting some of his experiences and anecdotes from the game in the comments. One of the things he posts is a ninety minute conversation between Steve Meretzky, who co-wrote Douglas' first Infocom game, and Michael Bywater, who worked on various projects with/instead of Douglas.

Worth a look if you're a fan of the man, and my fondest appreciation to BoingBoing for putting it in my RSS feed this morning!

On a vaguely similar note, people may have noticed that my Delicious bookmark posts have not been happening recently. I'm experimenting with Pinboard as a replacement for my social bookmarking requirements, but they don't yet have a post-to-blog option. I believe I can get them to sync with my Delicious account, though, so I may try to get something going again in the near future.

Happy Christmas, everybody!
johncoxon: (Default)
This is a fantastically interesting blogpost about Starship Titanic that begins with an explanation of how to get the game running on Windows/Mac/Linux for free and ends up with Yoz Grahame, one of the chaps who worked on the game, posting some of his experiences and anecdotes from the game in the comments. One of the things he posts is a ninety minute conversation between Steve Meretzky, who co-wrote Douglas' first Infocom game, and Michael Bywater, who worked on various projects with/instead of Douglas.

Worth a look if you're a fan of the man, and my fondest appreciation to BoingBoing for putting it in my RSS feed this morning!

On a vaguely similar note, people may have noticed that my Delicious bookmark posts have not been happening recently. I'm experimenting with Pinboard as a replacement for my social bookmarking requirements, but they don't yet have a post-to-blog option. I believe I can get them to sync with my Delicious account, though, so I may try to get something going again in the near future.

Happy Christmas, everybody!
johncoxon: (Default)

#40 Douglas Adams, Mostly Harmless, 1992

This is Douglas' last Hitchhiker novel, and it's definitely the least funny of the trilogy. However, it's also the one that has the most science-fiction -- parallel universes, suspended animation and advanced technological concepts abound.

Some of Douglas style is apparent in this book, most notably the one-liners that never really stop being funny, and the interplay between Ford and Arthur is hilarious as ever. Trillian's character is slightly oddly written compared to the previous novels, but given her non-appearances in SLATFATF and the Secondary Phase, the fact she's even present at all is, I guess, something to be pleased with!

This book is also easily one of the bleakest i've ever read, with virtually no hope or joy present throughout the tome and the depressing ending, but I still enjoy reading the novel. I'm nervous about reading Eoin's novel, but that is the next book!

Posted via LiveJournal.app.

johncoxon: (Default)

Something has just struck me: if I had read one more book before I started rereading Douglas Adams' Trilogy of Five, And Another Thing would have been my 42nd book this year. As it is, it shall be my 41st, which is deeply unsatisfactory!

#39 Douglas Adams, So Long and Thanks for All the Fish, 1984

Some people -- in fact, quite a few people -- don't like this book. There was an epic flame war on alt.fan.douglas-adams back in the day between Simo and Kaare over whether chapter 25 was a good passage of Douglas' writing. This novel is the first novel that Douglas wrote from scratch instead of adapting a radio show or a Doctor Who script or whatever, and it shows!

Cut for spoilers! )

All in all, this book is a good book, but it's very different to the others. My next read will be arguably the bleakest thing Douglas ever wrote!

Posted via LiveJournal.app.

johncoxon: (Default)

#38 Douglas Adams, Life, the Universe and Everything, 1982

The third book in the trilogy was based on a script for a Doctor Who film by Douglas that never got made, and that does shine through in some ways, but it's far less obvious than I remember it being. Unfortunately, this book marks the beginning of the end of Zaphod as a character -- at least, until tomorrow (hint, hint) -- which is a shame, since Zaphod is great.

This book, no matter how disjointed and derivative it may turn out to be, is funny as hell. I was told off by my parents for laughing too much last night! Marvin's lullaby is brilliant, as is the reaction of Ford to the news that there is a party. I really need to reread this one more often!

Now, onto the misguided romance novel...

Posted via LiveJournal.app.

johncoxon: (Default)

#37 Douglas Adams, The Restaurant at the End of the Universe, 1980

So I continue bravely on with my rereadings of the Trilogy of Five, this time reading the second in the series. Whilst the previous book is a fairly direct and literal retelling of the first part of the Primary Phase, its sequel is a little less faithful to its source material, retelling the end of the Primary Phase and the Secondary Phase with many bits swopped around, some new bits included and some parts entirely removed.

This, as it transpires, is entirely a good thing. I have listened to the radio series so many times that the first book is somewhat ruined by my familiarity with its source material. Because the second book is not as similar, I found myself giggling and chortling the whole way through, which was a bit odd on the train.

I'm looking forward to reading the next one!

Posted via LiveJournal.app.

johncoxon: (Default)
[Poll #1468494]

Posted via LiveJournal.app.

johncoxon: (Default)
Just a quick note to apologise to those of you who commented on my offer of 2-for-1 tickets to Hitchcon – I have a ticket, so I don't need to utilise the offer. However, [livejournal.com profile] viclet is looking for someone to do the offer with, so go comment on her journal if you'd like to do so. :)
johncoxon: (Alltami)
Does anyone reading this not yet have a ticket to Hitchcon but is intending to go? They're doing 2-for-1 tickets through Facebook, so if so, leave me a comment and we can go halves. Comments are screened.
johncoxon: (Default)

#26 Eoin Colfer, limited edition proof of first half of And Another Thing, 2009

I can't talk about it yet. No, really. It's pretty awesome though!

johncoxon: (Alltami)
The Eighth Douglas Adams Memorial Lecture is being given by Marcus du Sautoy this year, on the number '42'. Since this is the first one that's sounded even vaguely interesting since I've been old enough to trek into London for the lecture, I was wondering who else on my flist was considering going. Tickets are £15, I believe.
johncoxon: (Default)
Members of the University of Leicester's Department of Physics and Astronomy were today sent the link below. It is a scientific paper based on the Galaxy Zoo project and it is of Earth-shattering importance. I urge you all to give it a try...

http://arxiv.org/abs/0903.5377 (click the links on the right-hand side to see the paper)
johncoxon: (Default)
I went to see Andy Hamilton live this evening, and he was terrific - really funny bloke, did some nifty stuff and had me in stitches at points. After the interval he answered questions that people had written and left on the edge of the stage, and Cardinal Cox (a Peterborough fan, for those who don't know) asked if he'd mind relaying some memories of the late Geoffrey Perkins.

Hamilton replied by saying that he was a "lovely man" and told the audience that Geoffrey was the producer that encouraged his writing, when he was starting out, and then shared a rather nifty anecdote. They went on a roleplay day, arranged by the BBC, in which the staff had to confront their weaknesses, and Geoffrey's weakness was, apparently, bearing bad news - it was felt he needed to be firmer. They did a roleplay with a woman who was £3,000 over budget on her show, and apparently, after three minutes in the roleplay, Geoffrey was offering to pay her deficit out of his own money!

Just a nice anecdote I thought I would share with the flist - it will probably also make it into MH once I've e-mailed it to Carrie.
johncoxon: (Destruction of Earth)
I have no reaction to this. I can't for a minute see how Colfer's writing style is going to produce something as good as the original five books, and I don't think they should be commissioning a sixth.

I mean, I'll still have read it within thirty minutes of it being available... I just don't know if I'll like it.

And they wanted us to shut ZZ9...hah!
johncoxon: (Destruction of Earth)
I'd had one of the best days ever today, and now I'm upset. Geoffrey Perkins, the producer of the radio series of Douglas Adams' Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, and the creator of Mornington Crescent, died in a car crash today aged 55.

May he always Know Where His Towel Is.
johncoxon: (Default)
I have constructed a poll with three questions, two of which were inspired by people talking about Iron Man yesterday. I am just curious to know which of the below films people thinks is the best superhero movie - the films listed are the films I can see in the appropriate Wikipedia entry that I feel are most likely to be picked.

The other question is based on a movie. That movie was called The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, and in the runup to the film itself, a comic called Real Life Comics did five comics to mark the occasion. Those five comics were what got me into webcomics, and Real Life is still my favourite as an almost direct result of that. Now, Greg, the writer and artist, offers prints of any comic strip which are signed and sent out to you for $15, so I'm thinking about getting one after the exams. Help me pick!

[Poll #1184557]
johncoxon: (Default)
Michael Bywater is set to publish a book which talks about his relationship with Douglas Adams, according to this comment on a recent related news story. Michael Bywater was an integral component in the Douglas Adams story, having been the guy who spent a lot of time working on projects such as Bureaucracy and Starship Titanic, and was the inspiration for the character Dirk Gently. I have heard rumours about their personal relationship in the past and it will be excellent to read a book that would set the record straight.

Suffice to say I will doubtless pre-order a copy. If you're surprised, you clearly don't know me!

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