The Ashes

Dec. 8th, 2010 06:12 pm
johncoxon: ([Cricket] Sidebottom's Celebration)
I want to talk a little about the cricket, and Twitter's not really the medium, so it's time for a LiveJournal post!

I've been eagerly following the cricket since England arrived in Australia, and having been very pleased with our form in the three warm-up games, I was rather dismayed by Australia's first innings at the Gabba and extremely relieved that England managed to pull it back with some absolutely brilliant cricket from Strauss, Cook and Trott seeing us through.

Following the cricket in Adelaide was much more brilliant. Following a day's play in which we claimed ten wickets on a batting pitch, we promptly sent our batsmen out to show the Australians how it's done. Although Strauss was out uncharacteristically early, Cook, Trott and KP steadied the boat, with Colly, Bell and Prior providing valuable support towards the end of the innings after Cook and KP were finally claimed. We declared before lunch, and had four wickets by the end of the fourth day, with the final six wickets falling in short order in the morning of the fifth.

So let's look at the bowling so far in the series. Our best bowler is the new boy, Finn, who has figures of 9-281 at an average of 31.2 (although Boycott on the TMS podcast is worried that he's not looking as good in the matches' second innings). Swann did much better in the second innings of the Adelaide Test, and has figures of 9-322 at 35.8. Anderson has figures of 8-257 at an average of 32.1.

Stuart Broad, who has bowled as many overs as Anderson or Finn (Swann has been bowling more than the other three members of our attack, as far as I can see) has only managed to bag two wickets, but he has conceded almost a hundred fewer runs than Anderson and 120 fewer than Finn. Broad's strength lies, in my uninformed opinion, more in his ability to bowl with incredible discipline than to take a lot of wickets.

In the game against Australia A, we played our backup bowlers instead of our frontline attack. 7-121 for Tremlett, 6-151 for Bresnan, 3-111 for Panesar, 3-126 for Shahzad. Panesar bowled the least and also conceded the fewest runs, with Tremlett bowling more than Bresnan/Shahzad and also conceding a low number of runs. Panesar is a spinner (and has also been confirmed not to be in the running by Flower) so Tremlett, on the face of it, is the obvious choice.

However, we hit upon a snag. Broad's also our number seven batsman, and has scored a century for England in Tests in the past (although his duck in the first innings at the Gabba is the only datum for this series, and it's hardly a signal of a fearsome batsman!). Tremlett's batting average in Tests is 12.5 runs compared to Bresnan's average of 41.7 (a less defined discrepancy between the two is visible from their first-class figures – Bresnan's first-class average of 27.5 is only ten more than Tremlett's) and Tremlett was in as the 11th man in the match against Australia A.

Although Flower has said that Bresnan, Tremlett and Shahzad are in the running for Broad's position in the forthcoming Tests against Australia, I can't see Shahzad being the choice because he's not as good a batsman as Bresnan and his figures don't match Tremlett's. Bresnan and Tremlett are both capable of playing a similar role in the team, but Bresnan conceded the most runs out of the four bowlers played during the game against Australia A. Bresnan's batting is much better than Tremlett's but certainly in the first game played in Australia, Tremlett's bowling outclassed him. Given the fine form of our high-order batsmen (all four top batsmen have made centuries, two have made double centuries), is the batting important? Certainly, given the high scores we've been making without getting into the bowlers, I'd be tempted to say it isn't and play Tremlett in place of Broad.

One thing is sure, Flower is not going to announce the replacement before the start of the next Test against Australia, meaning that the backup bowlers will play against Victoria on Friday. This is a good decision, as it means the primary bowling attack can rest (Boycott commented on Finn's tiredness on the TMS podcast after the first day at Adelaide, so it's probably a good idea), and it also means more data with which to make an educated decision on the replacement. However, it also means that whoever does replace Broad will play their first game with the rest of the primary unit against Australia in an actual Ashes Test, which could be slightly intimidating. I'm sure that all the bowlers can work well in the team, but whether they'll work as well as Broad will be something only time can tell.

The Ashes

Dec. 8th, 2010 06:12 pm
johncoxon: ([Cricket] Sidebottom's Celebration)
I want to talk a little about the cricket, and Twitter's not really the medium, so it's time for a LiveJournal post!

I've been eagerly following the cricket since England arrived in Australia, and having been very pleased with our form in the three warm-up games, I was rather dismayed by Australia's first innings at the Gabba and extremely relieved that England managed to pull it back with some absolutely brilliant cricket from Strauss, Cook and Trott seeing us through.

Following the cricket in Adelaide was much more brilliant. Following a day's play in which we claimed ten wickets on a batting pitch, we promptly sent our batsmen out to show the Australians how it's done. Although Strauss was out uncharacteristically early, Cook, Trott and KP steadied the boat, with Colly, Bell and Prior providing valuable support towards the end of the innings after Cook and KP were finally claimed. We declared before lunch, and had four wickets by the end of the fourth day, with the final six wickets falling in short order in the morning of the fifth.

So let's look at the bowling so far in the series. Our best bowler is the new boy, Finn, who has figures of 9-281 at an average of 31.2 (although Boycott on the TMS podcast is worried that he's not looking as good in the matches' second innings). Swann did much better in the second innings of the Adelaide Test, and has figures of 9-322 at 35.8. Anderson has figures of 8-257 at an average of 32.1.

Stuart Broad, who has bowled as many overs as Anderson or Finn (Swann has been bowling more than the other three members of our attack, as far as I can see) has only managed to bag two wickets, but he has conceded almost a hundred fewer runs than Anderson and 120 fewer than Finn. Broad's strength lies, in my uninformed opinion, more in his ability to bowl with incredible discipline than to take a lot of wickets.

In the game against Australia A, we played our backup bowlers instead of our frontline attack. 7-121 for Tremlett, 6-151 for Bresnan, 3-111 for Panesar, 3-126 for Shahzad. Panesar bowled the least and also conceded the fewest runs, with Tremlett bowling more than Bresnan/Shahzad and also conceding a low number of runs. Panesar is a spinner (and has also been confirmed not to be in the running by Flower) so Tremlett, on the face of it, is the obvious choice.

However, we hit upon a snag. Broad's also our number seven batsman, and has scored a century for England in Tests in the past (although his duck in the first innings at the Gabba is the only datum for this series, and it's hardly a signal of a fearsome batsman!). Tremlett's batting average in Tests is 12.5 runs compared to Bresnan's average of 41.7 (a less defined discrepancy between the two is visible from their first-class figures – Bresnan's first-class average of 27.5 is only ten more than Tremlett's) and Tremlett was in as the 11th man in the match against Australia A.

Although Flower has said that Bresnan, Tremlett and Shahzad are in the running for Broad's position in the forthcoming Tests against Australia, I can't see Shahzad being the choice because he's not as good a batsman as Bresnan and his figures don't match Tremlett's. Bresnan and Tremlett are both capable of playing a similar role in the team, but Bresnan conceded the most runs out of the four bowlers played during the game against Australia A. Bresnan's batting is much better than Tremlett's but certainly in the first game played in Australia, Tremlett's bowling outclassed him. Given the fine form of our high-order batsmen (all four top batsmen have made centuries, two have made double centuries), is the batting important? Certainly, given the high scores we've been making without getting into the bowlers, I'd be tempted to say it isn't and play Tremlett in place of Broad.

One thing is sure, Flower is not going to announce the replacement before the start of the next Test against Australia, meaning that the backup bowlers will play against Victoria on Friday. This is a good decision, as it means the primary bowling attack can rest (Boycott commented on Finn's tiredness on the TMS podcast after the first day at Adelaide, so it's probably a good idea), and it also means more data with which to make an educated decision on the replacement. However, it also means that whoever does replace Broad will play their first game with the rest of the primary unit against Australia in an actual Ashes Test, which could be slightly intimidating. I'm sure that all the bowlers can work well in the team, but whether they'll work as well as Broad will be something only time can tell.

The Ashes

Dec. 8th, 2010 06:12 pm
johncoxon: ([Cricket] Sidebottom's Celebration)
I want to talk a little about the cricket, and Twitter's not really the medium, so it's time for a LiveJournal post!

I've been eagerly following the cricket since England arrived in Australia, and having been very pleased with our form in the three warm-up games, I was rather dismayed by Australia's first innings at the Gabba and extremely relieved that England managed to pull it back with some absolutely brilliant cricket from Strauss, Cook and Trott seeing us through.

Following the cricket in Adelaide was much more brilliant. Following a day's play in which we claimed ten wickets on a batting pitch, we promptly sent our batsmen out to show the Australians how it's done. Although Strauss was out uncharacteristically early, Cook, Trott and KP steadied the boat, with Colly, Bell and Prior providing valuable support towards the end of the innings after Cook and KP were finally claimed. We declared before lunch, and had four wickets by the end of the fourth day, with the final six wickets falling in short order in the morning of the fifth.

So let's look at the bowling so far in the series. Our best bowler is the new boy, Finn, who has figures of 9-281 at an average of 31.2 (although Boycott on the TMS podcast is worried that he's not looking as good in the matches' second innings). Swann did much better in the second innings of the Adelaide Test, and has figures of 9-322 at 35.8. Anderson has figures of 8-257 at an average of 32.1.

Stuart Broad, who has bowled as many overs as Anderson or Finn (Swann has been bowling more than the other three members of our attack, as far as I can see) has only managed to bag two wickets, but he has conceded almost a hundred fewer runs than Anderson and 120 fewer than Finn. Broad's strength lies, in my uninformed opinion, more in his ability to bowl with incredible discipline than to take a lot of wickets.

In the game against Australia A, we played our backup bowlers instead of our frontline attack. 7-121 for Tremlett, 6-151 for Bresnan, 3-111 for Panesar, 3-126 for Shahzad. Panesar bowled the least and also conceded the fewest runs, with Tremlett bowling more than Bresnan/Shahzad and also conceding a low number of runs. Panesar is a spinner (and has also been confirmed not to be in the running by Flower) so Tremlett, on the face of it, is the obvious choice.

However, we hit upon a snag. Broad's also our number seven batsman, and has scored a century for England in Tests in the past (although his duck in the first innings at the Gabba is the only datum for this series, and it's hardly a signal of a fearsome batsman!). Tremlett's batting average in Tests is 12.5 runs compared to Bresnan's average of 41.7 (a less defined discrepancy between the two is visible from their first-class figures – Bresnan's first-class average of 27.5 is only ten more than Tremlett's) and Tremlett was in as the 11th man in the match against Australia A.

Although Flower has said that Bresnan, Tremlett and Shahzad are in the running for Broad's position in the forthcoming Tests against Australia, I can't see Shahzad being the choice because he's not as good a batsman as Bresnan and his figures don't match Tremlett's. Bresnan and Tremlett are both capable of playing a similar role in the team, but Bresnan conceded the most runs out of the four bowlers played during the game against Australia A. Bresnan's batting is much better than Tremlett's but certainly in the first game played in Australia, Tremlett's bowling outclassed him. Given the fine form of our high-order batsmen (all four top batsmen have made centuries, two have made double centuries), is the batting important? Certainly, given the high scores we've been making without getting into the bowlers, I'd be tempted to say it isn't and play Tremlett in place of Broad.

One thing is sure, Flower is not going to announce the replacement before the start of the next Test against Australia, meaning that the backup bowlers will play against Victoria on Friday. This is a good decision, as it means the primary bowling attack can rest (Boycott commented on Finn's tiredness on the TMS podcast after the first day at Adelaide, so it's probably a good idea), and it also means more data with which to make an educated decision on the replacement. However, it also means that whoever does replace Broad will play their first game with the rest of the primary unit against Australia in an actual Ashes Test, which could be slightly intimidating. I'm sure that all the bowlers can work well in the team, but whether they'll work as well as Broad will be something only time can tell.
johncoxon: (Default)

Today saw me waking up Far Too Early due to my half-brother deciding I needed to be up! After some initial grumbling, he mentioned the magic word -- Krispy Kremes -- and so I got out of bed and had breakfast with the family. Eggs with English muffins are always good.

At eleven o'clock, my brothers and I went down to the beach to grab a spot and spy some planes and suchlike, because it was the final day of the Bournemouth Air Festival. We saw the Yakovlevs; the Blades; a Hawk T1; the Lancaster; a Chinook; the Sally B Flying Fortress; a Spitfire and a Mustang; a Eurofighter Typhoon and a flyover and display from the Red Arrows. I also read quite a lot! A picture of EPIC SUNBURN is going to be on Twitter.

Later on we're planning on paying Harry Ramsden a visit to have some of his famous fish and chips, before heading to the pub (something that, last night, was replaced by a stroll through Bournemouth to have a look at some fireworks and an awesome sculpture I hope to get photos of and blog about later this holiday!).

And last but not least, I'm excited that we regained the Ashes and absolutely thrilled with Trott's contribution! New bloke did well and was instrumental in setting Oz a high total to chase.

That's all for now, take care kids!

My Week

Jun. 17th, 2008 11:30 am
johncoxon: (Default)
So, this week's been mental. I haven't actually blogged properly since my D&D2 post, so I reckon that's probably something I ought to do! On the subject of exams, I reckon they all went OK, and I think I passed most of them, except possibly electromagnetism. I am definitely confident that I passed all the second-year advancements, so I am hopeful about them, but we'll see what happens. Hopefully I won't have to come and resit anything!

On the Monday of last week, I played Shadowrun (fourth edition) with friends in the afternoon, which was fun - it's a game that's sort of half magic, half cybernetics, and so my character can drive vehicles with his head. That evening a friend from home stayed over, and as a consequence I was up very early on Tuesday because they had to go to work. The Tuesday saw me nip into town and hang out at Josh's watching him pack for a while, but the Wednesday saw me going to Alton Towers with Tom, Ash, Nicola and Lianne, which was made of Win. It was really, really good fun. I have two of the ride photographs at home, which I haven't uploaded to Facebook yet - we went on both water rides, and five or six rollercoasters. Great day out. Incidentally, the time elapsed between the point at which I started queuing for Nemesis and the point at which I went on the ride is somewhere around six years - we went in Year Eight but the ride broke down before I got to go on it. The Wednesday night saw me going home for a couple of days, which was good.

I got back to Leicester on the Friday, and was instantly playing Fireborn with my broodmates. They raided a brothel without me! :'( We beat up a demon with our l33tness, and rescued our old boss, who had previously been assumed dead (apparently just checking for a pulse isn't enough in this game - who knew?). It was a lot of fun, and straight after that it was time to set up for the end-of-term game of Warhammer 40,000 - around 14,000 points, give or take a couple, on each side. My personal tank detachment included ninteen tanks and two superheavy tanks. We kicked Terminator arse with the big guns.

The end-of-term game ran 10:00-18:00 on both the Saturday and the Sunday (we eventually lost because they had one more objective than we did - it was very close, though) and on the Saturday evening was the ball. Feeder came out and played, saw Right Said Fred with their only good song, and Zane Lowe DJed. Imagine someone giving the kid who never lets a track stay on for more than twenty seconds a mic and a mixing deck, and you have Zane Lowe. Pendulum also did a DJ set, and there were fairground rides and suchlike also. We ended up staying til around four in the morning - we could've stayed to be survivors, but I had to get into uni fairly early the next day and one of the people I went with was also a gamer.

Monday, I played badminton for two and a half hours in the morning (I will be playing a lot more next year, I think) and went along to GameSoc in the evening to finish constructing a Tech Guard list to play against the Dark Angels whilst watching a D&D group attempt to slay the dragon. The group is very political (they have a few lawyers in there) and so it's interesting watching them play because most of the games I've played in have been far less politics-based!

And now I must be off, I am en route to a friend's to do more geeky stuff. Adios!

Cricket

May. 18th, 2008 05:44 pm
johncoxon: (Default)
From the TMS online commentary: "Vaughan now has Test tons against every Test-playing nation except Zimbabwe, who he can't play against anyway. He's also tied with Graham Gooch as the scorer of the most Test centuries at Lord's - six." It's pleasing to see solid performances from Strauss and Vaughan, Pietersen's dismissal was slightly less pleasing, however. England are now forty runs ahead of the tourists with one wicket left in hand, and with only a day left of play, a win for either side looks unlikely unless someone gets really, really lucky with their bowling.
johncoxon: (Default)
We go somewhere you don't go - uni! uni!
We go somewhere you don't go! University!
University! University!
We go somewhere you don't go! University!

The University of Leicester beat the local polytechnic's rugby team 15-9 (it would have been 20-9 had the referee not been a wanker in DMU-tinted spectacles) and the women's team won 15-0. Lots of cheering and shouting was in evidence and it was jolly good fun. Also, many, many chants. Leicester always has the best chants. DMU usually chooses between 'DMU! DMU!' or 'You suck!' whereas ours usually have tunes and everything. It was a damn fine game of rugby.

At the beginning of the game, five penalties were awarded - two to us, three to them. They made the most of this, scoring 9, but we missed one with the result that half an hour into the game, they were 9-3 up. However, we pushed forward and scored an epic try which was converted about a minute before half-time, so we went into the break still cheering as the scoreboard read 10-9 to Leicester. In the second half, another try cemented our lead before another try was disallowed by the blind biased no-idea-what-he-was-doing fucking referee. However, despite this blatant attempt to get DMU into a better position, alongside the thirteen minutes of injury time he tacked onto the end until the entire Leicester segment of the crowd was yelling 'What time is it?' and it became obvious that Leicester weren't going to concede a try, we still won it.

A great day. :)
johncoxon: (Default)
ENGLAND!!!!!!!!!

Cricket

Sep. 14th, 2007 01:14 pm
johncoxon: (Cricket - Vaughan Batting)
me: Why is Luke Wright opening in our Twenty20 side?
Liam [livejournal.com profile] derbyboy88: Cos he's a Twenty20 specialist, that's why.
me: What does that mean?
Liam: It means he gets out quickly.
johncoxon: (Cricket - Sidebottom Celebrating)
England 188-3 vs 187 India: England win the match and win the series! Oh yeah!
johncoxon: (Cricket - Vaughan Batting)
The latest Facebook poll amused me. Also, though, if you look at the stats, it turns out that men love ninjas and women love pirates.

Also, India are 187 all out, and England have fifty overs to get 188 and win the series. Should be fun! [crosses fingers and touches wood] EDIT: What the fuck was that? Wright and Prior both gone in the first fucking over?

ODI

Aug. 24th, 2007 10:35 pm
johncoxon: (Cricket - Vaughan Batting)
India 329-7 v 320-8 England.

A damn good, closely fought and well played game of the finest sport in the universe. Some fucking awesome cricket - Broad hitting two fours and two sixes, and Mascarenhas hitting lots of sixes, it was all very dramatic. Hell, if he'd hit a six off a no ball on the last ball we'd have won! Suspense all the way to the end, and that's what makes cricket great - it's unpredictable to the extreme in the short form and absolutely beautiful in the long form. Roll on more ODIs, that was my first listen to a ODI TMS commentary and I will definitely tune in to hear more! :D

Morons

Jul. 2nd, 2007 12:33 am
johncoxon: (Tea Problemsolving)
I am just posting to publicly retract the description of Dax [livejournal.com profile] fallen_ink as a 'legend'. The man's a complete and utter cunt, with no hope of ever becoming even close to a decent human being, and he's the first person I've ever awarded that accolade (in the main, I think people are awesome, but that's just my style). I could go into detail about how much of a cunt he is, but I'll just leave it at that, I think, cos I have better things to do.

In other news, Collingwood seems to be doing quite well as England's one-day captain and the police are kicking arse and taking names, it would appear. I am tempted to do this 101 things in 1001 days thing, but I'm undecided. And I can't wait to get my external drive (no change there, then!).

Jerusalem

Jun. 12th, 2007 03:21 pm
johncoxon: (Eagles Guitars)
Whilst I love And Did Those Feet... and the English Cricket Team, the Jerusalem single released by "Keedie & The England Cricket Team" is something I've not yet decided on... The gospel mix is OK, the sing-a-long version is crap (where did the words go?!) and the radio edit, well, it doesn't really have enough ooomph. It's gotta be sung with some ooomph. The G4 one is OK, it's got some more ooomph, but it's also about ten times more pretentious. So can anyone recommend a decent version of the song, preferably one that's available on iTunes?

Cricket

Jun. 11th, 2007 03:20 pm
johncoxon: (Cricket - Sidebottom Celebrating)
Gosh, this last week's match against West Indies (in which we put on 370 runs in our first innings, watched the West Indies get to the low two hundreds before getting 6-13 in the last stages of Day 3 and then proceeded to let the Windies come to a fairly high score at the end of Day 4 so that some people were worried we might not win the match), was a real corker, chockablock of suspense and some damn fine cricket. But I think my favourite quote from the commentary is this one, from the last wicket:

"What a catch from Ian Bell! Collymore smashes a Monty leg-stump tweaker onto his pad and seemingly past Bell at at least 600 miles an hour, only for the diminutive short-leg to fling himself sideways at 601mph and cling on."

England win the match by sixty runs and win the series. :)

Headingley

May. 26th, 2007 08:55 pm
johncoxon: (Cricket - Vaughan Batting)
Well, this Test is going much better - Sidebottom has proven himself as he's taken half of the opponents' wickets thus far, we're doing well at the end of day two with only eight more wickets to take to win the game, and Vaughan and Pietersen both performed exceptionally well yesterday with some top-quality run scoring - good for Vaughan to give a big metaphorical middle finger to his critics (me included, at points) and good that we've found another decent bowler. All we need is for Flintoff to come back and we really will be on top form! :D

Cricket

May. 18th, 2007 06:18 pm
johncoxon: (Trescothick)
England v West Indies, first test, Lord's: "[It is] the first time since 1938 that four Englishmen [have] hit centuries in one innings of a Test." [BBC] Gosh, since when did we have a world-class cricket team?

Cricket

Aug. 5th, 2006 09:13 am
johncoxon: (Trescothick)
I just feel like posting something about the English cricket team, in light of their recent victory over Pakistan in the second Test and the third Test curently being played. Since the Ashes against Australia in summer of last year, we haven't been performing excellently by anybody's stretch of the imagination. We struggled against India and Sri Lanka where we shouldn't have been struggling, and that's for a variety of reasons, amongst which are the illnesses and injuries the team has witnessed (Michael Vaughan, Simon Jones and many other top players). This is the aspect of our troubles which I want to talk about.

I seem to remember that at one point, six of the eleven players that made up the Ashes XI were injured and unable to play, and we weren't playing well. This was understandable, if a little irritating. However, we seem to be performing at a much better standard in the Tests at the moment against Pakistan. This isn't because those injured players have come back from their injuries - indeed, Vaughan is currently unsure as to whether he will ever play again, it has been reported. It's because we have fashioned yet another brilliant team, a coherent force of good and solid cricket players who know how to beat their opponents.

Essentially, we have two very good cricket teams and around sixteen to seventeen extremely good players, all of whom can work in a team, with two players (Vaughan and Strauss) capable of leading the squad and many others (Jones, Flintoff, Harmison, Hoggard and Panesar) capable of taking the wickets. Then add on those players good with making the runs (Pietersen and Trescothick, for example) as well as players still finding their feet in Test cricket as a result of other players being injured (the injury of Geraint Jones has left England capable of trying new players in his role) and you're looking at a pretty sweet setup.

The main reason we have so many tuned players capable of playing to a high standard is because of those injuries that looked (for a worrying moment) like they might be our undoing. The injuries we suffered after the Ashes has meant that we have had a chance to put new and more inexperienced players in the roles of the Ashes-winners, and those new players have finally risen to the occasion. The Australians again have a reason to be scared of us in the forthcoming November Ashes series. We are good enough to beat them, and the new players and faces in the squad mean that they'll have a hard time predicting our next moves. At any rate, the next Ashes series will be an exciting one to behold.

Now, does anybody have Sky Sports...?

Cricket

Jul. 6th, 2006 04:21 pm
johncoxon: (Alltami)
We've just lost the Ashes. Although our team is strong, it's Vaughan which unites it and makes it work as a team. Without him in command (and as is evident from the more recent tests in which we have played) we are not good enough to win in Australia at the end of the year. It's a shame, but it's life, as they say.

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