johncoxon: (Default)
This is a fantastically interesting blogpost about Starship Titanic that begins with an explanation of how to get the game running on Windows/Mac/Linux for free and ends up with Yoz Grahame, one of the chaps who worked on the game, posting some of his experiences and anecdotes from the game in the comments. One of the things he posts is a ninety minute conversation between Steve Meretzky, who co-wrote Douglas' first Infocom game, and Michael Bywater, who worked on various projects with/instead of Douglas.

Worth a look if you're a fan of the man, and my fondest appreciation to BoingBoing for putting it in my RSS feed this morning!

On a vaguely similar note, people may have noticed that my Delicious bookmark posts have not been happening recently. I'm experimenting with Pinboard as a replacement for my social bookmarking requirements, but they don't yet have a post-to-blog option. I believe I can get them to sync with my Delicious account, though, so I may try to get something going again in the near future.

Happy Christmas, everybody!
johncoxon: (Default)
This is a fantastically interesting blogpost about Starship Titanic that begins with an explanation of how to get the game running on Windows/Mac/Linux for free and ends up with Yoz Grahame, one of the chaps who worked on the game, posting some of his experiences and anecdotes from the game in the comments. One of the things he posts is a ninety minute conversation between Steve Meretzky, who co-wrote Douglas' first Infocom game, and Michael Bywater, who worked on various projects with/instead of Douglas.

Worth a look if you're a fan of the man, and my fondest appreciation to BoingBoing for putting it in my RSS feed this morning!

On a vaguely similar note, people may have noticed that my Delicious bookmark posts have not been happening recently. I'm experimenting with Pinboard as a replacement for my social bookmarking requirements, but they don't yet have a post-to-blog option. I believe I can get them to sync with my Delicious account, though, so I may try to get something going again in the near future.

Happy Christmas, everybody!
johncoxon: (Default)
This is a fantastically interesting blogpost about Starship Titanic that begins with an explanation of how to get the game running on Windows/Mac/Linux for free and ends up with Yoz Grahame, one of the chaps who worked on the game, posting some of his experiences and anecdotes from the game in the comments. One of the things he posts is a ninety minute conversation between Steve Meretzky, who co-wrote Douglas' first Infocom game, and Michael Bywater, who worked on various projects with/instead of Douglas.

Worth a look if you're a fan of the man, and my fondest appreciation to BoingBoing for putting it in my RSS feed this morning!

On a vaguely similar note, people may have noticed that my Delicious bookmark posts have not been happening recently. I'm experimenting with Pinboard as a replacement for my social bookmarking requirements, but they don't yet have a post-to-blog option. I believe I can get them to sync with my Delicious account, though, so I may try to get something going again in the near future.

Happy Christmas, everybody!
johncoxon: (Default)

TheAppvent Calendar is giving a different game away free every day throughout December. Some have been really good, so I recommend giving it a try!

Posted via LiveJournal.app.

Windows 7

Aug. 16th, 2009 11:33 pm
johncoxon: (Default)
As some of you will know, and fewer of you will care, I recently upgraded the RAM in my MacBook so it now has a very nice 4GB of memory. One of the many and various upshots of this is that I can now actually install the Windows 7 RC in a virtual machine using VMware and see what's what.

So, I installed it. The installation process was absolutely painless, and a joy to go through, much unlike the Windows ME/XP installations. I got into the operating system, installed VMware Tools and followed a link from the system tray to a page that let me download AVG Free to keep me safe from viruses and suchlike.

A restart later and I'm ready to have a quick poke at the operating system by seeing what happens when I load up one of the only things I ever use Windows for anymore – Minesweeper. The first thing I noticed was this prompt, which came up after I double clicked on Minesweeper in the 'Games' folder.

Cut for images and length! )

At some point I might play some more with Windows 7, but right now, I am going to curl up in a corner and shiver with terror for a while...!
johncoxon: (Default)
So this weekend saw the first of the two weddings of 2009, as my friends Pete (or, as we call him, Gramps) and Christine tied the knot in front of close friends and family. It was an ace weekend, and I had a great time... I may have ended up ever so slightly completely wankered, but that's really understandable, and I don't think I massively offended too many people with my drunken state.

The day afterwards I eventually got up and showered before having breakfast/lunch at Burger King with the friends who'd been at the reception. At around noon, I bade them farewell and headed over to Bicester to spend some quality time with [livejournal.com profile] simbagirl. Unfortunately, we didn't find her a graduation outfit, but we did spend time walking in a wood, so I reckon it balances out, really. It was a good day, and awesome to spend time catching up properly!

In news unrelated to weddings, I bought The Conduit for the Wii on Friday, and although the wedding got in the way of excessive play, I have been playing it and I can cautiously report that it's rather good. I have found a couple of parts really very very hard (and personally I think all guns should have bullets and am therefore not so fond of the alien weaponry available) but I've managed to get past every challenge with sufficient effort and the plot is unravelling nicely, so all's well. I'd be interested to see what online play is like – [livejournal.com profile] snowking, are you planning to get a copy? Anyone else I know going to be playing?

I went round to visit [livejournal.com profile] hawkida the other night, and spent three or four hours catching up with her, which was awesome for all the right reasons, and came away with five sacks of stuff to donate to charity in addition to fifteen or sixteen cans of pre-drinks for the aforementioned wedding. She mentioned that I suck at updating my LJ, hence this roundup of events.

The last really major thing is that I went to see the Eagles again on Wednesday night in Birmingham, and they blew my mind. I was really glad they played Witchy Woman from their first album, since I'd not heard that live yet, but I'm a bit gutted stuff like Peaceful Easy Feeling made it in when tracks like Tequila Sunrise or Busy Being Fabulous didn't, but all in all I thought the setlist was really good and strong. Another couple of surprise inclusions were Dirty Laundry and Funk #49 – both on the Farewell I tour and neither of them Eagles tracks, I was kind of expecting the evening to spend less time on the band's solo careers than their last set, but both of them kicked ass so I'm not complaining at all!

Other than that, not a lot has happened. I've been spending time happily getting reacquainted with all the schoolfriends I never seem to get in touch with during termtime, and generally whiling away my days. Work is boring but the evenings haven't been yet, and the first four weeks of being home have been really rather quick. It'll be September in no time, which is good - I kind of miss my physics...

I have nothing at all interesting planned for a couple of weeks now, so don't expect much updating until I go to see the Banksy exhibition in Bristol in a fortnight's time. Until then, ciao!
johncoxon: (Default)
I got my Nintendo Wii the month after it came out, whilst I should have been revising for my first round of A2-level exams, and whilst I must confess I enjoyed Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess, I found the experience was slightly lacking. I gave up playing LoZ:TP after about thirty-five hours of gameplay (I intend to come back to it and complete it this summer, it's a pride thing), and although Mario Kart Wii is fun in short bursts, I'm the first to confess it probably hasn't justified the money I paid for it yet. The other game I got back then was Red Steel, which was, although a fairly competent FPS, by no means great (or indeed all that interesting a plot). The graphics were poor, even for a Wii game, and the swordfighting was really not a good showcase of the Wiimote's potential.

The reason I mention Red Steel last is because I bought a copy of Nintendo Official Magazine today, and it has a feature in it on the sequel. As some of you will know, there's a peripheral coming for the Wii this summer called the MotionPlus, which adds functionality to the Wiimote - essentially, the console now knows exactly where your hand is and how you're moving it, meaning that much finer controls are available. Red Steel 2 uses this functionality to finally deliver the epic swordfighting that people have been waiting to see on the Wii since its conception.

To cap that off, the developers have opted for a cel-shaded, almost Japanese arthouse style of graphics. Graphics are not the Wii's strong suit, it's nowhere near as powerful as the PS3 or the Xbox 360, and that is blatantly obvious in some games, so the solution is to opt for stylistic graphics that make a game unique, rather than the überrealistic graphics found in the Xbox 360's and PS3's games at the moment. This is pleasing, I must confess, and I really think it works well in other games of the same type (XIII and Viewtiful Joe are both cel-shaded GameCube games and neither looks like it's an old game today, so why not harness that for the Wii?).

This is encouraging enough for my underused Wii as it is, but that's not the only thing currently getting me all excited about my little white box. Sega have been beavering away on some games for the Wii this year, and they released House of the Dead: Overkill and Mad World pretty much at the same time. I purchased HOTD:Overkill recently and I was amazed at how good it is. It's a prequel to the other HOTD games, and it's in the same arcade style - the Wiimote shoots mutants, you put the Wiimote in the Wii Zapper or lightgun accessory of your choice and you're away! It's amazing to play, really, really good fun and I'm currently working my way through the director's cut (it's haaaard).

On the subject of Sega, Mad World also looks like good fun (I got it today, not played it yet) and they're releasing a game soon called The Conduit, an FPS designed specifically to be played on the Wii, which looks awesome. Another game I'm currently getting excited about is Need for Speed: Nitro, which is another game specifically designed for play on the Wii, and will be a different experience from the upcoming game Shift for the Xbox 360 and PS3. I think that's good - you're far more likely to do well from a game designed for the console you play it on, than a game designed for a different console, and intelligent use of the Wii's controls is usually far better than a port from one of the Wii's big brothers.

Oh, and then again, there's the GameCube compatibility. I bought Viewtiful Joe, a brilliant game I never owned for the GameCube, recently, and also the bongos you could get are coming in handy for nights playing videogames with my mates.

I have spent the last year being unconvinced by videogames that were either shitty ports for the Wii or videogames that were expensive and would have required a console I was unsure I wanted to buy for me to play them. Suddenly, I've bought an extra three videogames in the space of a month and I'm playing on my Wii every day. I toyed with the idea of selling my Wii so many times last year, and I am so glad I didn't. The humble games console from Nintendo is finally becoming a viable choice for those of us who don't just want to play minigames or keep fit.
johncoxon: (Default)
Saw this on [livejournal.com profile] warhammer40k and thought I'd share for the Dawn of War fans who don't read it: Tyranids confirmed for Dawn of War II.
johncoxon: (Zelda Link's Awakening)
I now know that my days as a console gamer (or at least, as the fanboi I once was) are ending... Upon hearing my brothers' boast that Xbox 360 would support eight-way chat, I responded, "Hang on, let's log into IRC..."
johncoxon: (Default)
Games Workshop once did a computer game in the future of ONLY WAR that starred Tom Baker and Brian Blessed in speaking roles. It's a shame that the game scores 47% on Metacritic, or I'd have bought it!

Holocaust

Jul. 16th, 2008 05:43 pm
johncoxon: (Default)
"To the people who complained about Holocaust jokes in the last video, I think when everyone who died in something would be dead of old age by now anyway it's OK to start taking the piss." - Yahtzee Croshaw in his review of Alone in the Dark.

Discuss.
johncoxon: (Painkiller)
zomg Yahtzee has a hat!
johncoxon: (Painkiller)
I knew that Yahtzee hated the Ctrl-Alt-Del webcomic, but, well, blimey. Although he's got some good points. Of course, he does end the review with a block of text saying, "Note that I mentioned no actual names in this article so if you think I'm talking about you and your comic then that says more about your feelings than mine."
johncoxon: (Default)
I have no idea if you have to be a member of Nintendo's website to see this link, but it's Wii Fit incense sticks, that you can purchase with your loyalty points. WII FIT INCENSE STICKS.
johncoxon: (Default)
I reckon that Latvia ought to win, but I am wondering why we gave Greece douze. Although, the girl's really quite cute (more cute every time I have another beer)... also, the UK and Finland were two of the better songs, so I'm confused as to why both countries are languishing in the latter ten... Not that I really give a damn, though! Oooo, we just got six points from San Marino. They should be in the contest every year. Loving the "(they speak Serbian)" on the subtitles on Ceefax.

On the geek front, exams are going OK - electromagnetism was a bit hairy but the three maths exams I've had have been alright. We are currently looking into getting a server for the house next year, which will be cool. I am also reinstalling Windows XP on the desktop PC, and I'm going to go and get a new power supply for it tomorrow, with luck. Also, the Penny Arcade video game, On the Rain-Slick Precipice Episode One, is awesome, and any game that's released on Windows and Mac OS X at the same time deserves mention. Go play the demo!

Finally, Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skulls was excellent for the first hour and then the plot got steadily weirder and weirder as the remaining hour went by. I'd give it another watch, though, it's by no means a bad film, although I gather it's doing very poorly in the cinemas at the moment. ETA: Spoilers in the comments.
johncoxon: (Default)
From the ever-brilliant BBC technology blogs: "It looks like the iPhone could give mobile gaming a much needed boost and provide Nokia's N-Gage some real competition." Yes, I'm sure that's Apple's intended rival...

I should blog about the phone's new bits: essentially, Apple are putting ActiveSync in, making the iPhone a viable business phone at last. They're also releasing an SDK for developers to write true apps - although a free application will be free to put up, anyone who wants to code and release programs onto the phone has to pay a $99 one-off fee, and 30% of profit made by charging for apps goes to Apple. This means that the smaller, less commercial developers (say, for instance, all the developers currently running homebrew apps on the iPhone through the hacks released) aren't really going to have much incentive to publish through iTunes and are going to carry on releasing through the hacks. We shall see how this works out for Apple. ETA: And I agree with [livejournal.com profile] bohemiancoast that it will probably be OK for them. lol!

Oh, and the above quote was triggered by the fact that EA have already announced they're porting Spore to the platform (and have constructed a working demo in less than two weeks, which is damn impressive) and SEGA have annoucned that they're planning to code for the platform, and are bringing Super Monkey Ball to it initially. To be honest, this sounds like the iPhone could be pretty damn impressive from a gamer's perspective, what with the accelerometer and all. We shall see - but to be honest, if the gaming side of things doesn't work, Apple have hardly sold it on that basis, so it's not going to hurt their business strategy in a major way. Although I'm sure it'd be better if they could sell lots of games.

Also amusing to note is that RIM and Palm share prices both dropped during the iPhone SDK announcement. And, finally, in Soviet Russia, phone calls make you!

Portal

Jan. 7th, 2008 01:03 am
johncoxon: (Default)
I just completed it for the very first time (I don't have a Windows machine powerful enough to run it for more than five minute stretches and so had to wait for my brother to get it before I could actually play it for more than fifteen minutes, even though I've been waxing lyrical about its awesomeness for ages) and I would like, as a result, the Orange Box soundtrack and this Companion Cube T-shirt.

There aren't any plushes yet! :(
johncoxon: (Default)
I have just installed, on my Mac, a program that lets me run Windows as an application within the Mac (VMware Fusion, in this case). I have used it to install RollerCoaster Tycoon 2 and hot diggety, it's good. I have a park rating of over 950 with 1750 guests, aiming for 600 and 1500 respectively. I'm quietly optimistic. :)

EDIT: 999 and 2,000! :D

Portal!

Dec. 7th, 2007 02:32 am
johncoxon: (Default)
I haven't watched it yet, but Weebl has posted a Portal reference over on the site. :)
johncoxon: (Default)
I'd never heard of Paul Thurrott before today, but I've just read his review of OS X Leopard. He says he fully expects to be slammed by Mac fans over it, and that's because some of the stuff he claims is patently untrue!

For instance, he says, "since Leopard, like all previous Mac OS X releases, excludes certain classes of Macs from its compatibility list, some users will simply need new hardware. This is another area where Apple is far more aggressive than Microsoft, and it leads to more technically advanced but less compatible system. Thus far, Apple's users have been openly supportive of this policy, opening their wallets every time the company announced a new product."

Er, try getting Windows Vista to run on a PC that's five years old, you freak. OS X Leopard can do it, but Vista can't, so how can you justify telling us that Apple is, on this front, "far more aggressive than Microsoft"? You can't. I mean, most of it is fairly reasonable logic, but it was that statement that ruined the article, since he's either a) stupid or b) biased, rendering the whole document (clocking in at twelve pages A4) irrelevant and unimportant.


Also on the subject of Apple, for those of you old enough to remember the Newton, there's a nifty iPhone mod here that makes the iPhone look more similar to a Newton. I liked it - it's very cool.


In news entirely unrelated, I played a video game called Portal today, by the chaps over at Valve (and if you've never heard of Half-Life, then I have to wonder how you managed to ever connect to the Internet). It's great in that the Physics engine is absolutely out of this world - there is absolutely no way I can properly describe how it works, but you know when you look in a mirror, and there's a mirror behind you, and you're reflected unto infinity? This game can display that in real-time, and you can create an infinite loop where you simply fall and fall and fall through the same space repeatedly. It's an exceptionally clever concept, it's intuitive yet difficult to master, and I am so getting The Orange Box to play on my Mac (God bless dual-boot machines).

It's also a game where, in order to incite the character to play, you're told you'll get cake when you've completed the tasks. That's clearly genius.

Most Popular Tags

Syndicate

RSS Atom

July 2014

S M T W T F S
  12345
6789101112
13141516171819
2021 2223242526
2728293031  

Style Credit

Powered by Dreamwidth Studios